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If You Build It, Will They Come?

While more than 100,000 Rohingya refugees came through our clinic doors for consultation and treatment last year alone, far too many women remain hesitant to make the short journey from their homes to receive medical care. It’s because of the unknown.

He Hid in a Latrine. Now He’s a Humanitarian.

Redwan lived in a small village in Myanmar with his wife, two children and extended family. On a quiet morning in 2017, they heard gunshots nearby and ran out of their home to witness a slaughter. The entire village —…

Every Baby is a Miracle

A young mother, far away from her home, without a place to safely deliver her baby. It happened more than 2,000 years ago. The most miraculous birth in human history. Jesus — the baby who brought hope and redemption to…

From Trauma to Thankfulness

Our team first met Harun in 2018, when he was 8 years old and had narrowly escaped the brutal violence against the Rohingya in Myanmar. The story of how his family became refugees — and the trauma he experienced —…

When Children’s Art Helps Heal a Community

Our work to provide loving care means that we don’t stop once physical needs are met. We continue working to meet people’s emotional needs as well. Our team on the ground has launched innovative programs to harness the joy and optimism of the Rohingya youth and make an impact on the entire community. Community Health Workers are the hands and feet that make that happen in the Kutupalong Refugee Camp.

No Other Option: Morjan’s Story

“We had no choice – they left us no options. They were chopping necks. They were raping women. We had to leave.” Morjan tells of her escape to Bangladesh.

The 7 Deadly Summer Dangers

This year, people living on the margins face a growing number of dangers. They live in places where disease, violence and persecution are a way of life. Here are seven deadly dangers to watch for during the summer of 2019.

Rohingya Brace for Severe Weather

Summer brings with it the threat of unpredictable weather. In Bangladesh, this year’s weather has been particularly hard on the refugees. In the cramped quarters where they live, cold, damp conditions lead to life-threatening situations.

The Heartache and Happiness of Pregnant Women

When Nur Ankiz began feeling pain in her abdomen, she knew she was about to give birth. At first, the pain seemed normal to the mother of 12. It turned out to be anything but.

Power Presence: How Volunteering Heals

Not all pain is visible. It’s not as if anguish is something you can diagnose with a simple assessment—or treat with a pill. Hurt, after all, can cut scars far deeper than what we see with our eyes.